What Does the “Strong” Button Mean on a Keurig

By | July 24, 2019

What Does the Strong Button Mean on a Keurig

For greater, bolder taste in your coffee, this new option has been created — the idea of the creators behind this was to allow consumers, like you and me, the option for something with a ‘true kick’, especially in those mornings when we may need something ‘a little stronger’ to wake us up and alert our senses, preparing us for the day ahead.

That being said, there are a few other points worth mentioning with respect to the strong button on your Keurig:

  • When your coffee takes a longer time to brew than usual, this will increase the taste of your coffee, making it stronger and sharper, so to speak.
  • Suppose you use the setting labeled ‘regular’, or something to that effect ; in this case, a single cup can brew pretty quickly (we’re talking about a minute or less here, tops).
  • But when you make your setting ‘strong’ instead, that brew time we mentioned will span out to longer than a minute.
  • And this, in turn, will allow the coffee grounds to actually steep themselves in the hot water for longer periods of time, making for a much stronger – tasting coffee altogether.

Nice, right? But there’s more to note on this:

  • In order to get the job done properly, on ‘strong’ mode, the coffee machine is known to release water on intervals, as opposed to releasing it all in a single stream.
  • This will thus allow each coffee ground to get steeped well before going down into the cup itself, and that alone can make a world of difference as well.
  • Keep in mind that it will not necessarily increase the amount of caffeine that’s in your cup, but it will make for a taste that will certainly seem otherwise (a bolder cup of Joe, to say the least).

Here’s another post on how this is similar to the 1-4 button on a regular coffee maker.

Where did this originate? Even more to note….

Many attribute the Keurig 2.0 as the first coffee maker to officially incorporate the ‘strong’ button, and some after it have begun to feature a similar option as well.

And keep in mind that the extraction time will remain a pivotal factor in the overall brewing strength.

Ask yourself these questions as well, important points we may potentially cover in another post:

  1. What grind of coffee are you using?
  2. How old is your pod / cup / source of the coffee itself?
  3. Are you using the Green Mountain brand, Starbucks brand, some other brand?
  4. And what does the brand stand for / making itself known by, in terms of its coffee?

So, Does the Keurig “Strong” Setting Work? Does it Actually Make Things Stronger?

In my experience with coffee makers and other small appliances, I’ve found that many of the extra, supposedly “innovative” features that many of them boast are often just window dressing.

However, when it comes to the “strong” setting featured on most Keurig coffee makers, I can say with certainty that it is not just there for show. In fact, whenever I brew a cup with my Keurig, I always use this setting, and it never disappoints.

But how does the Keurig “strong” setting work? Read on to find out!

How Does Keurig’s “Strong” Setting Brew a Stronger Cup?

It seems impossible, right? You use the same pod with the same machine and get the same volume of brewed coffee, so how could selecting this “strong” button actually produce a stronger cup of coffee than without this setting?

It’s Just a Matter of an Extended Brew Time

The answer to this perplexing question is actually more obvious than you would think. The way a Keurig 2.0 can truly brew a stronger cup with the exact same pods and amount of water all comes down to the time it takes to brew the coffee.

If you just pop your Keurig K-Cup pod into your pre-heated machine and start the brew without selecting the strong setting, your fresh cup of coffee will be ready in under 45 seconds (source).

But if you do everything the same, except this time you do select the “strong” setting, it can take up to 30 seconds longer for the machine to produce your brew, or a minute and 15 seconds (source).

How Does a Longer Brew Time Translate to Stronger Coffee?

The fact is, this is just the way brewing coffee works!

Think of it this way, when talking about coffee, “strength” refers to the amount of dissolved solids in the resulting liquid—that is, stronger coffee has a greater proportion of dissolved solids in relation to the amount of water (source).

Solids are dissolved in the water through the process of extraction, which takes place during the time that the water is in contact with the ground coffee.

Thus, the longer brew (extraction) time for Keurig’s “strong” setting means more dissolved solids, which results in a stronger cup. Simple, right? No more weak coffee for us!

And then there are even more ways to get your stronger cup:

Are Smaller Keurig Cups Stronger Than Big Cups?

If you like your coffee strong like I do, you’ve probably run into a bit of trouble with the coffee strength you can get from Keurig machines. Often, it seems as though Keurig coffee makers simply can’t brew a strong cup of coffee.

But there’s good news! You don’t have to give up the convenience the Keurig single-serve coffee makers just to get a decent strength cup of joe.

There are a couple of sure fire ways of brewing a stronger cup with your Keurig machine. The first is simple: get a Keurig machine that includes the brew strength feature as we’ve discussed above.

The second is to buy Keurig pods with greater “intensity.” My personal favorite is Keurig’s own Green Mountain Double Diamond.

But is there another way?

What About Just Brewing a Smaller Cup?

When I first got my Keurig and ran into the issue of weak coffee, the first solution I tried was to simply brew a smaller volume of coffee using the same Keurig pods.

My thinking was that it just made intuitive sense that my coffee had been weak because the greater volume of water in the water to coffee ratio simply diluted the coffee. In other words, I assumed that there was just not enough coffee in the pod to produce a stronger cup at that volume.

So, did brewing a smaller cup produce stronger coffee for me?

Yes & No, It’s Complicated

Unfortunately, for many people smaller cups don’t produce a noticeably stronger brew but some people do see an increase in strength.

The reason has to do with the nature of Keurig machines and how they brew coffee, especially when their is a strong button or strength selector incorporated into the machine.

Since Keurig machines are designed to brew coffee quickly, the amount of time the water is in contact with the pod’s ground coffee is extremely limited so a big cup of coffee will extract fast a weak just like a small cup will.

Thus, brewing a cup with less water doesn’t substantially change the flavor or strength even though it does slightly.

When you slow down the brew time with the strong button the water-to-grind contact time increases and you can more easily tell a difference in strength from large to small cups of coffee but even then the speed of the brew is responsible for a lot of the taste differences.

You might notice a slight strength increase by brewing a smaller cup, but nothing like the strength you can get from the “strong” option on the various k-cup brewers on the market, which does increase the amount of time the water is in contact with the coffee, resulting in a much stronger cup.

The only major caveat I’d like to bring up is these slight differences in strength become big differences in strength and taste if you compare 6-ounce cups of coffee to 12-ounce cups. In my opinion even on the bold setting a 12oz cup brewed in a Keurig will always taste weak so definitely keep the cup size down a bit.

Final Thoughts

All that said, it’s very important to get quick, strong flavored coffee, for many. Yet that is only one crucial factor in the coffee – drinking experience. There is so much more we need to assess…..

If you’ve got an 8 – ounce K – cup, and you wish to see what this bad boy ‘strong’ button can do, give it a whirl. Be patient. And by patient, yes, we do mean you need to wait at least 1 minute and 15 seconds (but probably just a little longer)….